Andy Murray + Ivan Lendl = Australian Open title?

Andy Murray enters this year’s Australian Open ranked 4th (as usual), coming off a strong head of stream with a 5-0 record in 2012, at last years Oz Open he was the presumed favorite – but something is different this year.  Or so it may seem.

Murray has won over $19 million in prize money, has yet to capture the elusive Grand Slam title, but has come close a few times.  He lost in the finals at last years Australian Open to Djokovic 46 26 36, but in that same year he reached the semifinals of the French, Wimbledon and the US Open (each time losing to Nadal).  Further, Andy reached the finals of the Australian Open in 2010 losing to Federer 36 46 67, and the finals of the US Open in 2008 again losing to Federer 26 57 26.

It has been his court demeanor, particularly when losing, that so many find “galling.”  Complaining, moping, deploring those in his box with his seeming “bad luck,” those are more often the actions of a petulant junior rather than a leading world class player.

Enter his new coach, Ivan Lendl, and a rather unusual quote from the Scot, “You win like a man, you lose like a man.”  As many wonder whether this coach player pairing will work, Lendl must either improve or remove the notion that Murray’s head and on court temperament has been the issue.

There may be something to this partnership, and though not readily remembered, Lendl secured his Grand Slam title run with the benefit of a particularly keen “logotherapist.”  In 1985, Alexis Castorri made the tennis player an offer he couldn’t refuse:

“I’ll bet you $1,000 I can design a physical and mental program for you and, if you follow it honestly, by the end of the U.S. Open, you will be the No. 1 player in the world.  And if you win, you don’t have to pay.”

Seven months Lendl won the US Open.

Castorri devised a program for Lendl based on logotherapy, which posits that man’s only freedom is the attitude they choose. Meaning, players must face the possibility of losing before walking on court, face that fear, and then put it behind them – perhaps this is what Murray meant when he mentioned “winning and losing like a man.”

For interesting reading, check out Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl

Murray has yet one more hurdle to face.  In 2011 he was ranked 93rd in percentage of points won on his second serve, and Djokovic was ranked first in points won returning the second serve.  This year Murray has improved a little, now ranked 66th in this important points won on the second serve category.  But to my mind, this is still Murray’s Achilles heel.  In many matches his first serve reaches 130 mph, but in those same matches some second serves are 80mph or less.  And as I continue to study nuances of the serve, and what Pete Roger and Pancho (Gonzalez) have in common, Andy’s serve appears different.  My hunch is that he strokes it, you see way too much hand and arm speed in the follow thru, and far less snap or whip at the top of the swing.  Sampras once credited his seven Wimbledon titles to having the “best second serve in the game.”  For Andy to take the next steps, that I believe is his real project, along with (of course) playing like a “man.”

 

57 Comments

  • mark

    Reply Reply January 22, 2013

    Look guys, all this talk of 1st and 2 nd serves reminds me of a tennis teacher here in England who said that if he was to write the Tennis rules he would only allow one serve ! My, that would change things somewhat. . We would I suspect see more time taken before the ball is tossed and more crafty serves eg The American kick serve . So I guess non of us will be in a position to re write the rules so why dont we slip in the occasional slice/ kick serve as the first serve?

    Also are we brave enough to make the second serve the fastest one ? If you think about it the shoulder and wrist are now loosened up …………
    (ps all this talk of rewriting the rules reminds me of Mac s campaign to reintroduce the wooden racket….togue in cheek of course but have a go……..)

  • Jean Pierre

    Reply Reply January 21, 2013

    Bravo! Jim, Great piece on Attitude! Not just for Tennis but for LIfe in General. And now, on Jan/2013 after Murray pocketing his 1sts: Olympic Gold Medal & Grand Slam, he has shown that he is learning to control his Attitude and improving his 2nd serve. Still ways to go but clearly on his way perhaps to his 2nd GM at the Aussie Open. Just like the Reyes’ Dictum to Agassi: “weak legs command and strong legs obey” so is the “weak minds breed poor attitudes.” And by having added Dr Castorri’s logotherapy to his team, I believe he now has a winning cocktail. And, it is quite possible that Andy might have read your 2010 piece about the pros of pouching Lendl as a coach.
    Now for us Rec players, trying to hone our elementary skills, it would help a lot if you could place Andy’s 1st & 2nd slowmo serves side by side with Pancho’s, Pete’s and Roger’s. To be able to see (a video is worth a million words) the timing and wrist snapping nuances compared. I know this is asking a lot but hey, if you cannot ask your coach then from whom?

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 21, 2013

      Jean – thanks and actually I have just done that with Roger and Andy – but did not have the software in my own computer so this will be published perhaps next week at TennisOne.com
      Jim

  • John

    Reply Reply January 23, 2012

    The remarks about winning and losing with the same attitude are a reprise of the famous poem by Rudyard Kipling. It should be required reading, if not memorizing, by all athletes.

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 23, 2012

      John – thanks, Kipling was eloquent – I am doing my best – but so much of this is all about Rafa and Fed and how they handle themselves on the biggest of stages
      Jim

  • Ernie Zike

    Reply Reply January 20, 2012

    Interesting ideas, lease tell me more!

    Ernie

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 20, 2012

      Ernie – we do a lot on our home page – use the search function for Sampras, Federer, Sharapova – you name it
      Jim

  • Drew

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    It’s not commonly said, you win or loss by your second serve, for nothing. A second serve somewhat puts you on the defensive starting the point. That is, unless you have a second serve that is well placed, pace that’s not that much off from the first serve, and has spin that will keep the receiver guessing. If Murray is hitting 80 MPH second serves against today’s opponents. When his competitors are accustom to returning 130 MPH serves. I would say he definitely has a second serve problem. However, his mental attitude may also come into play when it comes to these semi-final, finals matches. It will be interest to see if Lendl gets the same results with Murray that Alexis Castorri got with Lendl.
    I’m enjoying all the comments and appreciate the instruction on the serve. I’m still working on that consistent ball toss and snap to generate more spin. I still don’t get the kick I’m looking for.

  • Sigurd

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    Jim,
    I am a good player and have played tennis for 45 years, on pracice I hit hard and fluid. In a match I am turned to a “pusher”and only “safe” my strokes into the court without putting to much pressure on my opponent. I start on only using defensive underspin bachands althogh I have the capacity to topsin drives. I don´t use my tennis comptence full out and my´play becomes very predictable. The fear of missing/loosing is to big. Any cure you could suggest?
    Cheers,
    Sigurd

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 19, 2012

      Sigurd – that may be the nut of the logotherapy stuff Lendl received from the psychotherapist – in that the “fear” may be crippling your tennis – but equally it could be that your practice methods are incorrect in that if you practice at 80mph and play at 40mph then the trick would be to start practicing at 55 mph so practice is much more similar to the real thing – that said your description is common and many overhit in practice using strokes and tempo that they would never use in a match – upload something to Youtube down the road – let me see something of your game
      Jim

  • Rich

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    HI Jim,

    Logotherapy…….. Meaning of life , sense of. Purposes

    Lendl wanted to be the best…..physical fitness regiment
    That encouraged Sampas. Put a new approach to tennis

    Lendl beat McEnroe at French 2sets downwas the mindset change that made him great

    McEnroe was the best…. You beat the best

    Murray has to beat Fed in a major ….

    Fed is the best ever……beat the best when it counts…..

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 19, 2012

      Rich – well said – beat the best when it counts – and yes Lendl’s fitness did encourage Sampras who beat Lendl in his breakout US Open tennage title
      best
      Jim

  • Adrian Hill

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    Hi,

    Add one more – his mother!

    She should snip the cord and stand back.

    Yelling and screaming from the box reminds Brits of the worst kind of parent at junior school. She makes him look silly and gives him a bad image with the crowd.

    Murray is not a Roger. There’s no ballet star to watch nor a tiger moving like Nadal.
    Cheers Adrian

  • Noushin Kananian

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    Dear Jim

    Thanks a lot for your professional comments.
    Wish to see you soon.

    Kind regards

    Noushin

  • Gary Ranz

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    Jim, I believe you are correct! All the acceleration seems to happen after impact rather than before impact. I have recently been working on changing my service toss & motion utilizing the tips you have provided. I feel the acceleration & am now working on that elusive and more consistent toss.
    Thanks for your dedication to assisting players to improve their lifetime sport.
    ttfn geranz :-{}

  • Iain

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    Hi Jim
    Interesting comment regarding the hand and arm speed in the follow through. Would you say that this means he reaches the point of maximum racket head speed too late ie during his follow through rather than at impact? If so, do you believe this is down to one or both of the following reasons?
    1. With regard to his serve mechanics (and this is possibly a manifestation of the second psychological issue) that he turns his shoulders to face forward too quickly and doesn’t push up enough. This in turn makes it harder to reach maximum racket head speed at or close to impact as he can’t achieve the desired whip.
    2. From a psychological perspective, because a lack of confidence in the second serve is dissuading him (perhaps subconciously) from really hitting up enough, it feels safer to push through in a more forward direction which means less top-spin and the need to take more pace off the ball to keep it in?

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 19, 2012

      Iain – thanks for the note – years ago we worked with an electromechanical device that measured angular momentum – and with many servers (including an episode with Navratilova) it showed that many indeed had maximum racquet head speed after contact meaning they were still accelerating on the way “down” and to my mind Murray is the same –
      But as to why – somehow I think it has to do with the first years on court when the game is being formed – and for example Sampras or Federer found different feels at that age than did Murray – interestingly the badminton clear is the perfect model for an upward whippy hit
      Jim

  • Frank Nolan

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    Lendl may be a significant asset to Murray. I remember when he was on top of his game and he knows how to win.

    Murray’s serve. I wonder if he would get a bit more zip on it if he had a bit more of a Continental grip and possibly enabling more wrist snap? Check out Milos Ronic’s serve.

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 19, 2012

      Frank – Raonic is as good as it gets on the serve – loose whippy and he goes up for the hit – all about snap at the top of the swing
      Jim – our ballkids are working his first match at the SAP in February – what a treat

  • john

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    Jim
    I am 61 years old and I have improved my serve dramatically by using the serving motion I saw on youtube.Coming up with the racquet like a hatchet and the pronating the wrist has increased my speed and first serve percentage.My partner can now get some cheap points at the net.He is pleased and so am I.

  • Francisco J. Riveroll

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    Excellent article! I really think this “joint venture” of Andy Murray with Ivan Lendl can work well for Andy, if he is humble enough to learn from one of the greatest players of all times (although I recognize I was not very fond of Lendl because he appeared to me as if he was a robot without any feelings). But perhaps that is exactly what is missing in Andy’s game to improve and reach number 1, or at least number 2 in the world, which position is in his reach, due to Andy’s skills as a player… Let’s see what happens… Best regards,

    Francisco J. Riveroll (from Mexico City)

  • ricardo

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    Dear Jim:
    I like always your tennis comments, all of them, had been writing taking in account hidden side of the human being but actually the most dominant.
    I am 72 years old, already retired but still playing tennis mostly doubles, now that my mind is more relaxe due to several issues, mainly no son more job stress I am noticing that my tennis is improving and I understando much more differents details, but I noticed that even playing for the sake of joys, fears, inside doubt feelings are at presente damaging that should be, enyoiable time.
    I am vipassana practitiones as well and it improves these part of my life as well as others.
    I will read these Victor Frank.
    Have some direct recquest:
    Do you have a way to download your tennis lessons? because deliver cost is too high to argentina
    My country did have some good tennis player and still we have one which could Del Potro…could you post some comments on it?
    Could you write something for the old tennis retired players?
    Agree fully with your comments about the Scottish and on top of tha Lendl, I ve heard about these story but I thank you a lot to described it with so many details…The scotttish will succes, he play effortless and very nice to be seen

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 19, 2012

      Ricardo – all of our instructional products can be downloaded onto your computer – as to Delpo – I love his game but believe his serve is only average – and I wish I knew who had told him to toss the ball so darn high – it doesnt help anything
      Jim

  • Seongryong park isidore

    Reply Reply January 19, 2012

    It looks like that andy murray is too concentrated on the result of game. In a mental aspect,I believe that if someone wants to achieve a great goal or winning he should concentrate on only the way to win instead of wallowing in the field of imagination about ending. I feel that I unconsciously be afraid of ending result of game at everytime when I messed mygame up. Whenever a prediction grips my brain,I became to loose trust to myself and subsequently my muscle cells were going to be too constrainted,oversynaped and finally I losed controll to myself.
    This kinds of bad processing is what I called defeating oneself by trying to win even in a bad course.
    As I’ve read your good alalysis,I’m definitely agree to your point that said “win or lose like a man”. That should be a goal to play tennis game rather than just winning a good result. For this respect of tennis I became to love tennis especially. I hope rendle to teach andy what’s the essence of tennis. Thanks for this good analysis.

  • sudi

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    I think Murray has too many things going on in his head. He is too high strung and it shows on court especially in tight matches.Way too much negative energy. He should try Yoga.

  • Rich

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    HI JIm,

    Lendl was one the the best players ever. HE dominated off both wings

    Nobody hit it harder. He had it all. Serve backhand forehand. … He was a beast

    And with Tony Roche his volley improved. He was a dominant player. Of his era.

    Murray is not ! A totally different player……That’ s just the way it is…….

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 18, 2012

      Rich – but do remember, prior to 1985 Lendl (just like Murray) had won many many titles but to that point no Grand Slams – there was and is something to the “logotherapy” – the freedom to choose your attitude
      Jim

  • LONG

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Hi Jim,

    I agreed with you that it’s too much hand and arm speed in follow through of Andy. He need to improve his second serve in order to achieve more important titles like Grand Slam.
    It’s just a short time that Andy and Ivan Lendle cooperate with each other. I don’t think there’s much improvement on Andy’s games.It’s still early for him to get Australia Open this year. It’s might be the next Grand Slam of 2012.

  • S'Port

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    I still win matches thanks to my junior coach’s approach to the second serve. You may have heard of his son Ryan Harrison. We approached serving the same way a pitcher approaches a batter. It isn’t a “second serve” it’s the second pitch in the count. We learned how to hit the ball in a ballistics approach rather than flat, kick, side spin. We learned how to strike and make the ball move just as though we were pitchers throwing a curve or a slider. The second serve should have the ability to strike ’em out just like the first. His idea is to keep the opponent guessing and use their now reactive mindset against them. He also taught us that second serve time is show time. Get up for it and ruin their day. I lost every match for almost a year after I started with him. I had just moved up to 18’s and I was 15 years old and he wouldn’t let me use the cannon (115mph). If I did it was box jumps for 30 minutes. By the way Ryan (probably 12) was destroying all of us.

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 18, 2012

      SP – you were fortunate to have an excellent coach – and I may get in trouble for saying this – but coaches like that are few and far between
      Jim

  • Amar

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Tennis is a game of mind, body and skill. Presently it looks like Murrays attitude is limiting him and it looks this way due it its obvious display. Assuming Lendl is able to bring about a change we still have to see if Murray can extend the boundries of his body and skill.
    Small tip ‘ You do not achieve heaven without dying’

  • Patrick Whitmarsh

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Excellent article Jim, Andy was raised in the game as a counterpuncher. His second serve, the return of second serve and his ground game are from the counterpuncher theory of play. Lendl’s task: eventually turn his game 180. Look for a make-over with the mental processes as well as the strokes. My guess is 6 months to a year for significant indications. It will happen to the extent he is motivated and he develops the requisite trust with Ivan. Best to you Jim, Pat

  • Len

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    You are correct, Jim. Lendl might help. It looks that Andy has a timid and nervous (unsure of himself) personality (mentality, attitude). It is hard to be number 1 with this one. He is a talented fellow and his skills have been improving but what holds him back is he himself. You may come to court prepared to lose but you should feel and show to everyone that you are here to win. I am not sure if Landl (without some sort of psychotherapy) can change Andy’s attitude at his age of 25. Skills can improve, but people do not really change that easily. IMHO.
    Great article, Jim.
    Len

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 18, 2012

      Len – thanks, sometimes for this the question is whether it is the mental (Lendl) or the mechanics of the serve (??)
      Jim

  • Noriben Jay

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Hi jim

    First i wanna express heartfelt thanks to your tips especially in the KICK SERVE, Im always practicing it as a serve. With regards to andy’s game, he ‘s second serve needs improvement because as what i have observed his opponents finds it easy to return

    regards

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 18, 2012

      Norben
      thanks – players of any stripe are only as good as their second serve – here’s to improving yours (and mine)
      Jim

  • Adrian G Sahlean

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Totally agree with your analysis of the second serve. But why does he do it? If he has the good snap on the first, and at least on some if not most of the second ( do you agree with that?), then do you ascribe the ‘stroking’ to a mental hitch? A momentary fear to ‘go for it’?

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 18, 2012

      Adrian – somehow my hunch is the first serve is too flat and the second serve too dissimilar – and with Fed or Sampras their first and second deliveries are more similar than dissimilar – go to our home page to see Pancho Gonzalez to see the “real thing”
      Jim

  • Lisa Ann

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    I, too, would like to hear more details about the physical and mental program he designed for Lendl.

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply January 18, 2012

      Lisa – you can google Castorri as well as logotherapy – but to my mind the gist of the bet was for Lendl to face his emotions and accept outcomes but with that acceptance came or comes freedom – Mans Search for Meaning is an excellent book – I spoke with Castori but she was not inclined to comment on this article – but she is a practicing sports psychologist in Fort Lauderdale
      jim

  • Shripathi Kamath

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    I hope Murray wins one, but I think that it is more than just his second serve.

    Murray has ONE weapon. His first serve when he cracks it at 128mph or more. The trouble is, on a good day, he barely breaks the 53% barrier with that level of serving. 53% in Lendl’s days for that premium pace was good, even great, but not anymore.

    That’s it. You add to it his defensive abilities, and you have very little in terms of a slam-winning skill-set. He cannot hurt someone from the baseline, and he is not aggressive enough to follow his shots enough to the net, even if he has a serviceable net game.

    So how he’s going to beat Djokovic or Nadal? Both of them have more weapons, and are at least as fast around the court as Murray. He cannot hit them off the court, and physically they can battle at least as long as he can.

    It looks unlikely that he can win the AO this year, and in fact I pick Tsonga to take him out in four.

    If Murray has to win, Lendl has to focus on Murray developing a put-away attitude, and a shot to go with it

  • Mike

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Hi Jim, you hit the nail on the head about Murray’s on court whining. Its the main reason most everyone doesn’t like him. Not sure if Lendl can get the little boy out of him, but if he does it sure can’t hurt Murray’s image, I’m sure his attitude will change when (if) he ever wins a slam.

  • Liz

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Hi there,
    I agree with everything you have noted. As a huge Andy Murray fan I believe he can win a Grand Slam but he has to believe it himself and not let the mental demons get in the road. He’s an amazing player, so versatile and crafty. He needs to be aggressive from the outset, no more pussyfooting about!! I think he is trying to change that aspect of his game and is seeing the rewards for doing so. And yes he needs to work on his second serve and have the confidence to go for it. I think he just may pull it off this time, definitely ready. I predict he and Alexander Dolgopolov in the final and Andy will prevail.
    Thanks
    Liz

  • Debora

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    I agree with Richard’s comment. Hopefully Andy will make a great effort at the AO, but I feel like he will need a little more time to prove himself in 2012 before he could possibly create an upset. Perhaps 2013 could be his year, and that’s a moment I would not want to miss!

  • james kerr

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Jim,
    Congrats on a well thought out and informative article.
    I assume Andy is aware of the “93rd on 2nd serve stat”. THAT’S JUST AWFUL.!!
    I think his mindset is that his defensive skills are such that he can deal with aggressive returning and so he need not risk a double fault.
    Clearly that thinking needs to be revised, especially against the best.

    As for his demeanour it sometimes makes me cringe .
    I am Scottish myself and we can be a bit dour as a nation but Andy’s whingeing and facial expressions are horrible at times.

    Maybe he can learn to be more like his new coach was as a player.

    Anyway let’s hope you’re right and Andy + Ivan = Aussie open champ!

  • Jerry Winder

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Jim…Great stuff! I always enjoy your articles, and get something/insight from them! Have always been a big fan of Lendl…will look into logotherapy…Tnx! Best of 2012!
    Regards, Jerry

  • Joe DeRosa

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Jim,

    Well said, Hard to win slams with an 80 mile second serve and returners like Novak and Rafa.
    Think the same problem affected Rafa last year. After a great 2010 with an improved serve, he retreated to spinning it in and now seems to serve at 105 and 85. Maybe he can still win on clay but not good enough anywhere else.

    Very interesting story about Ivan.

    Thanks Joe

  • Bruce Harris

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    This is the first time I have heard a connection between Victor Frankl and playing tennis. I will have to give this some serious consideration.

  • Ken

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    I believe both serves should be hit with the same arm speed, the only difference should be where and how the racquet strikes the ball and the consequent follow through. The second serve depends more on spin and the target location, which the server applies according to the strengths and weaknesses of the receiver. The reliability of the second serve must be much higher than that of the first serve. Knowing your second serve will always work takes all of the pressure off your first serve, encouraging you to hit stronger and better first serves.
    You should spend huge amounts of time and effort on your second serve, under all wind and light conditions.

  • Richard

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Maybe Lendl will help Murray win a major. But Murray is basically stuck in a situation in which Djokovic, Nadal and Federer are better players than him. This fact is often overlooked by his critics because he is so dominant against everyone else. Hard to believe he hasn’t yet won a major, since he has won more masters titles than anyone in the Open Era who hasn’t won a Grand Slam event. Seems like with that record, he should be winning majors. But in any given match against one of the big three, Murray is the underdog. Of course, he can and will win against these guys sometimes, but unless he gets lucky, he has to go through two of them to win a major and the odds are against that. I think all three are confident against Murray when they meet in a major. So unless Murray is able to become a better player than the other three, which I doubt he will do in 2012 even with an improved second serve, he will need a lot of luck to go along with Lendl to win a major.

  • Kevin Campbell

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Great point on the attitude. It makes all the difference and, particularly, with a second serve. Obviously, if you can hit a high percentage of first serves, it stands to reason that you should be able to hit your safest of first serves at a high probability. I find that it is mostly in my head. Some days, I just feel confident in going for the second serve and other days I talk myself into weak or inefficient second serves. Murray obviously has great serve mechanics but has to allow himself to use them on both serves. Hopefully, Lendl can help him to mature as a player and the performance will follow.

  • Peter

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    I remember Lendl as a sourpuss worse than Murray-he became a winner, but never a fan
    favorite. This may work for Murray, but I see it as shortlived-sort of like the Roddick Connors
    association

  • Bob Feller

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Nice article – it peeked my interest in “logotherapy” and this Castorri guy. Anything published by Alexis regarding his work with mental toughness? I would be interested in reading more. Thanks for introducing me to a new name and aspect of mental toughness training.

  • omar

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Interesting article. It reminds me of something Jimmy Connors once said. He said that you won’t win if you play like you are afraid of losing. This was also a point made in the classic book, “The Inner Game of Tennis”. Win or lose, life goes on. So you might as well just focus on having a still, focused mind and playing your best.
    As far as Alexis Castorri goes, I would like to hear more details about the physical and mental program he designed for Lendl.

  • Andy

    Reply Reply January 18, 2012

    Jim you are bang on the money my friend. Great analysis.

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