ETI 053 | Rhythm – as simple as 1-2-3

  • ETI 053 Rhythm 123
    ETI 053 Rhythm 123

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One of the main elements of our game is tempo

We often think too much about mechanical issues without reference to rhythm

The following drill works equally well on your forehand or serve

Far too many come to this game with effort

In this drill, your entire focus will be on the “beats”

And whether forehand or serve the ball will be introduced on the “2”

Consider when Federer is playing well he always references his rhythm

8 Comments

  • Tony

    Reply Reply May 11, 2017

    Jim, you touch on one of five principles of a sound athlete. I think that’s what allows Federer to keep going as well as improving. As usual, you’re spot on! Keep up the good work. Thanks, Tony

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply May 11, 2017

      Tony – thanks – I can guess at a few of the five – I imagine balance, rhythm and efficiency, what are the other two – reminds me of Ben Hogan’s “The Five Lessons”
      best
      Jim

  • Alan Soffer

    Reply Reply May 11, 2017

    Jim, you are the best.

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply May 11, 2017

      Alan – as you might suspect – I do “approve” of your message – hope this makes you smile
      thanks
      Jim

  • Bill Cole

    Reply Reply May 11, 2017

    I really like this video Jim. You have a great idea for helping players “get out of the head, and into the body”. In tennis situations that players perceive as threatening (called appraisal), a player’s worry and rumination naturally increases. No one wants to mess up. We can’t stop that process, but we can manage it. It’s a matter of continually refocusing back onto the attentional cues that help us play well, and off of the cues that harm our focus. The counting of 1-2-3 is a nice substitute for these worrying thoughts, and, it also places focus on an aspect of playing that helps tap into the player’s natural athletic ability. The counting takes the player out of thinking mode, and allows them to shift into feeling mode. I ask my players, “When was the last time you played well in a match when you had a lot of thoughts in your head?” They almost always say they can’t recall of such a match. Then I ask, “What’s in your head when you’re in the zone?” They normally say, “Not much. I just play on automatic pilot”. That’s the value of counting.

    Thanks again Jim.

    Bill Cole, MS, MA

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply May 11, 2017

      Bill – thanks – we can do something together one of these days to send my readers your way –
      best
      Jim

  • allan haines

    Reply Reply May 11, 2017

    Having a few consistency difficulties your rythmn approach makes emminently good sense off to try out soon A

  • Christine Frank

    Reply Reply May 11, 2017

    Love this drill. I do a lot of drop-hitting for practice, but I never thought about practicing “rhythm.” I think it will also help me be less tight.

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