ETI 040 | The Xfactor

  • ETI 040 The X Factor
    ETI 040 The X Factor

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Imagine an overhead view, you are at the baseline practicing your open stance forehand, with your hips parallel to the net.

Power will come from the twisting of your torso, such that when you turn your shoulders to wind-up you are creating (from this same overhead view) an “X.”

Golfers work to create just such an Xfactor and the tension from the coiling of the torso and shoulders away from the hips creates a spring like effect where the turn into the ball occurs with more force.

17 Comments

  • Juan Chavez

    Reply Reply July 9, 2015

    Jim, I have learned more form you than anybody else.. you are AWESOME! Keep up the good work.

  • I think S. Goldberg is on the right track , how ever the power is actually angular not linear , hence the stance is at an angle to the ball flight . As Jim pointed out , the classic style from the past is inhanced by liear power(lower body) , as the foot positions are more “lined up to the ball line .
    J. McDonald and Jim hit it right On with the golf parelles , the most critical aspect of open stance striking , weather it be forhand or backhand is the middle body will be initiated before the shoulder portion of the body rotates . S. Goldbergs use of the word “kenitic”is now on point as the shoulders will “follow” the hips for angular power and vice versa for linear power .The said starts from the ground up , and the latter from the top downwards . An easy way to aquire open stance feel is to lift up your unloaded foot just prior to contact and the negative rotation will be felt : Jim , as always your light is shining !

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply July 1, 2015

      Tobin – thanks for the insight and the compliment!
      Jim

  • John

    Reply Reply July 1, 2015

    Nice accurate video. Cheers.

  • Kenny Wong

    Reply Reply July 1, 2015

    Jim,
    Great analogy in relating the tennis swing to a golf swing. In teaching my students, I have also incorporated your concept of “dead hands” to keep the student from taking the racquet back with their hand, versus shoulder\hip rotation.

  • Scott Craven

    Reply Reply July 1, 2015

    Great tip Jim….thank you!!

  • Donald McDonald

    Reply Reply July 1, 2015

    Please disregard my comment about not using my upper body. Turns out because I was trying something new I was swinging easier and I was so focused on feeling my racquet head that I did not even notice my upper body turn. My tendency is to think the idea is to set the racquet angle and forget it. By which a I mean do not do anything to suddenly change it. But unfortunately I literally lose track of the racquet head altogether with resulting poor contact.

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply July 1, 2015

      Don – no worries on the disregard – thanks for being in our online community
      Jim

  • Noushin

    Reply Reply July 1, 2015

    Many thanks for sharing your invaluable experience and knowledge! It’s really appreciated!

  • Donald McDonald

    Reply Reply June 30, 2015

    Talk about Serendipity. Two days ago I ran across a reference to Shmuel’s book on tennis while searching for something else. I golf rather than play tennis at this time of the year so I tried to create my golf swing entirely without using my arms. It has been years since I felt so athletic and the power was awesome. Went back today and had some wonderful shots, but a lot more bad ones. I realized that yesterday I created everything with my legs while today I tried to use my upper body too. When I rotated the legs which then rotated my shoulders which then rotated my arms, timing was almost automatic. Wondered if he had ever tried that. As far as I can tell his book is out of print.

  • Shmuel Goldberg

    Reply Reply June 30, 2015

    You are right. Twisting the torso is essential. This is the first link in the kinetic chain, the one that starts the rotation. Upward stretching of the body (bending the knees prior to twisting the torso and then raising the body) during body rotation accelerates this rotation to a speed that muscles alone can not create. This rotation eventually passes to rotation of the racket and the hand about the wrist joint. Because the racket is much-much smaller than the players body, it rotates much faster than the body. This speed (linear), not power, passes to the ball. So, twisting the body is only one factor in creating a significant speed.

    • Jim McLennan

      Reply Reply July 1, 2015

      Oscar – yes early on you simplified much of how we think teach and play the game – Tennis in 2 hours !!! I remember
      Jim

  • Brian

    Reply Reply June 30, 2015

    Jim,
    This really hit home! I am in my 60’s now and continue to pursue that elusive place of “effortless power” and suspect this is a big step in getting there. I hope sometime you will have a similar discussion on the one-handed backhand.

    Much thanks, Brian

  • Ron Sheeley

    Reply Reply June 30, 2015

    it took me a long time to figure out how beneficial the unit turn and coiling of torso was, and when I do it correctly during a match the ball sounds like a gun coming off the racket

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